Keep Cup standards

The Keep Cup has become the green bag for the café.

About a month or so ago I noticed a massive influx of customers using the re-usable plastic cup to replace the cardboard alternative we offer for takeaways.

One or two made me think similar shopping tastes were the answer, but upwards from 50 different Keep Cups from people ranging in age are stark signs that a movement is underway.

The Keep Cup is latte Tupperware. It’s made out of polypropylene, a type of microwaveable plastic that lasts up to four years. It was designed in Australia and marketed under the fact that it is of Barista standard.

Barista standard. What on earth does that mean?

It certainly couldn’t mean that I have to put two shots in the smallest size available to avoid customers telling me their coffee is too weak.

It also couldn’t mean that since the medium and large varieties don’t fit under the group handle I have to waste another cup collecting the espresso to pour into the environmentally friendly version.

I’m a barista, either my challenges are related to machinery or I’ve got to lower my standards.

As The Keep Cup Movement continues to rise, so do the amount of products.

Next month, they rollout the 4oz version for the babycino, pretend-coffee for children. Being a necessity for the two-year old certainly proves its popularity. But doesn’t secure my affection for a company that promotes a drink I greatly detest.

Yet, saving hundreds of cardboard cups from ending up in landfills makes the Keep Cup a hero. Sure it’s not perfect, but by holding it in your hand, like a green bag to the market; you’re showing others that you care about what goes into the trash.

As more and more people make this point, our environmentally conscious standards will rise.

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1 Response to “Keep Cup standards”


  1. 1 Josh August 26, 2010 at 2:10 pm

    Thank you for reminding me about babycinos. (even the word makes me cringe, it’s like the ‘mugacino’, all too often spelt with an h in there…yes, you may have some mug-pants) But yes. Thank you. It makes me appreciate not working in the northcote cafe which required babycino after babycino, and even had a (supposedly) cute kids book called ‘i *heart* babycinos’ ….
    On those hungover sunday mornings i could’ve so easily slipped in some arsenic.
    i think the best was ‘hi, i’ve brought in some rice milk, can you make Chesterfield Winter Oak Johnson here a babycino with it?’….yep, here’s some heat, two marshmallows and some chocolate dust, that’ll be $3.20…


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